Kenyon College
 

Untitled

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Catherine Opie
Click to view the gallery
 

Untitled #1 (Tea Party). 2010.

Inkjet print. Inkjet print.

16 x 24 inches.

Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

Untitled #2 (Tea Party Rally). 2010.

Inkjet print. Inkjet print.

16 x 24 inches.

Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

Untitled #1 (October 21, 2010). 2010.

Inkjet print. Inkjet print.

37 1/2 x 50 inches.

Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

 

Doodling turns dimensional. Metamorphosing common materials, Diana Cooper creates In these pieces, photographer Catherine Opie documents a Tea Party convention. Opie refrains from proselytizing and focuses instead on the common energy and desires pervading each scene. Her photographs highlight individuals within these groups, and ask whether their belief ties their identity to that group entirely, or whether there is a greater, more common humanity beyond the single-issue crowd.

 

Maddie Gobbo ’12

Post-Baccalaureate Curatorial Intern

 

Catherine Opie (b. 1961)

Untitled #6 (Immigration March L.A. 2006). 2010.

Inkjet print. Inkjet print.

18 x 24 inches.

Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

Untitled #2 (Immigration March L.A. 2006). 2010.

Inkjet print. Inkjet print.

18 x 24 inches.

Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

 

In these images, Catherine Opie documents a pro-immigration march in Los Angeles. These are scenes of active, single-minded commitment, but Opie also captures tender tableaus in the midst of the masses. A mother pushing a stroller and tending to her child, a man with lips pursed in a whistle, the hand of an unseen child clutching the corner of an American flag—these are quiet, personal moments in a collective fight to be recognized as citizens.

Caleb Bissinger ’13

Gund Gallery Associate

 

Catherine Opie (b. 1961)

Untitled #1 (March 4, 2009). 2009.

Inkjet print. Inkjet print.

37 1/2 x 40 inches.

Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

 

 

Catherine Opie’s portrait work often focuses on members of niche social groups, ranging from high school football players to Boy Scouts to San Francisco drag queens. Opie, an openly gay artist, has long examined the tension between community and otherness. In this photograph, Opie takes a documentary approach to the relationship between the individual and the group—while everyone carries the same banner, they all gaze in different directions. Here Opie captures a lull in the parade, a moment of pause for these activists. While many of the marchers look pensive, there is a sense of emotional catharsis among these individuals politically free to to celebrate their sexual orientation. And while Opie’s composition may seem informal, in fact she plays up a tender irony in this candid moment. By organizing her shot around two tuxedo-clad men she gives the work a striking, comical and romantic focal point.

Maddie Gobbo ’12

Post-Baccalaureate Curatorial Intern

 
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