Kenyon College
 

Black Women/Black Lives – Scholarly Articles

[+]

The student curated exhibition Black Women/Black Lives explores multilayered intersections of race, feminism, resistance and politics. To dig deeper into the subject consult the following readings:

The Art of Romare Bearden. Edited by Ruth Fine. Washington: National Gallery of Art in association with Harry H. Abrams, New York, 2003.

Cahan, Susan. Mounting Frustration: The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power. Duke University Press, 2016.

Cox, Julian. Road to Freedom: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement, 1956-1968. Atlanta: High Museum of Art; Seattle, WA: Distributed by University of Washington Press, 2008.

Farrington, Lisa E. Art on Fire: The Politics of Race and Sex in the Paintings of Faith Ringgold. New York: Millennium Fine Arts Pub., 1999.

Gibson, Dawn-Marie and Jamillah Karim. Women of the Nation: Between Black Protest and Sunni Islam. New York: New York University Press, 2014.

Jacob Lawrence: Moving Forward Paintings, 1936-1999. Essay by Patricia Hills. New York: DC Moore Gallery, 2008.

Jeffries, Bayyinah S. A Nation Can Rise No Higher Than Its Women: African American Muslim Women in the Movement for Black Self-Determination, 1950-1975. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2014.

King-Hammond, Leslie. “Inside-Outside, Uptown-Downtown: Jacob Lawrence and the Aesthetic Ethos of the Harlem Working-Class Community.” In Over the Line: The Art and Life of Jacob Lawrence, 67-96. Edited by Peter T. Nesbett and Michelle DuBois. Seattle: University of Washington Press in association with Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonné Project, 2000.

Lamm, Kimberly. “Between the Open and the Hidden: Clothing, Segregation, and the Feminine Counter- Archive in the Photographs of Gordon Parks.” Critical Arts: A South-North Journal of Cultural & Media Studies (December 1, 2015), 134-149.

Latimer, Tirza True. “ ‘We Can Make It Come True’: Faith Ringgold’s Dinner At Gertrude Stein’s.” English Language Notes 51.1 (Spring/Summer 2013), 129-135. Mahler, Anne Garland. “The Global South in the Belly of the Beast: Viewing African American Civil Rights through a Tricontinental Lens.” Latin American Research Review (January 1, 2015), 95-116.

Ongiri, Amy Abugo. Spectacular Blackness: The Cultural Politics of the Black Power Movement and the Search for a Black Aesthetic. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009.

Seidman, Sarah. “Tricontinental Routes of Solidarity: Stokely Carmichael in Cuba.” Journal of Transnational American Studies vol. 4, no. 2 (2012), 1-25.

Sims, Lowery Stokes. “The Structure of Narrative: Form and Content in Jacob Lawrence’s Builders Paintings, 1946-1998.” In Over the Line: The Art and Life of Jacob Lawrence, 201-228. Edited by Peter T. Nesbett and Michelle DuBois. Seattle: University of Washington Press in association with Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonné Project, 2000.

Stewart, Marta Reid. “Women in the Works: A Psychobiographical Interpretation of Jacob Lawrence’s Portrayal of Women as Icons of Black Modernism.” Source: Notes in the History of Art vol. 24, no. 4 (Summer 2005), 56-66.

Taylor, Clyde. “After the Black Arts Movement.” Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art vol. 29 (Fall 2011), 62-71. Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties. Edited by Teresa A. Carbone and Kellie Jones. Brooklyn, New York: Brooklyn Museum; New York, New York: The Monacelli Press, 2014.

 

Image: Bruce Davidson (American, b. 1933) Time of Change (Damn the Defiant), 1963. Image courtesy of the Gund Gallery.

 
ADD A COMMENT