Kenyon College
 

Alumnae: 50 Years

August 30, 2019–May 31, 2020  [+]

The Gund Gallery’s first-ever Associate-curated alumnae artist series, Alumnae: 50 Years, celebrates five decades of women’s impact on Kenyon College. As these artists return to their alma mater, we reflect on the ways in which the College influences and is influenced by its ever-changing student body. This series explores the interaction between bodies and the environments they inhabit, ranging from the body as an industrial being in the natural environment to a woman’s body as a commodity in the political arena. We hope that 50 Years sparks an awareness of our roles as active participants in an ever-changing system, whether that be Kenyon or beyond.

We gratefully acknowledge that the curatorial research and concepts formulated in an alumnae show proposal by Chair of Faculty and Studio Art Professor Marcella Hackbardt contributed to the development of this series of exhibitions.

On view now:

Mallory Cremin ’84 & Cynthia Brinich-Langlois ’04

October 4-November 1, 2019

With diverse repertoires of artwork that include quilts, cyanotypes, lithographs, and books, Mallory Cremin ‘84 and Cynthia Brinich-Langlois ‘04 explore how landscapes have been altered by human activity. Cremin’s usage of fabric draws the issue of large-scale pollution into an intimate sphere, addressing issues such as pesticide disposal and domestic water use. Brinich-Langlois’s lithographs track the consequences of drought and her hand-drawn books follow the changing conditions in rural Wyoming sites
through twenty-four hour periods. Cremin and Brinich-Langlois position us not merely as audience and observer, but lead us to question the mark we make on the natural environment by our very existence.

Exhibition Related Events:


Past installations:

Mia Halton (American, b. 1950), Mad As Hell, 2017. Ink on paper. 20 x 40.5 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Mia Halton ’73
For Girls Becoming Women; everyday encounters

August 30-September 27, 2019

Mia Halton ‘73 (American, b. 1950), a member of Kenyon’s first class of women, kicks off Gund Gallery’s celebratory Alumnae: 50 Years series with a whimsical installation of ceramics and figurines that explore the concept of everyday encounters in the lives of women and girls. This notion suggests a mixture of the unexpected and the mundane that make up the environment inhabited by women. Pop culture, the political present, and childhood literature all inform Halton’s understanding of encounters, resulting in a diverse range of subject matters that range from the revolutionary #METOO movement to the implications of The Scarlet Letter. Much of her work also playfully subverts the traditional narratives within fairy tales that serve as an early example of gender expectations. Intentionally cartoon-like and anonymous to encourage personal connections with the art, Halton’s work tackles the heavy themes of gender inequality and inequity with aesthetic and thematic whimsy.

 

Full Fall Schedule:

August 30-September 27, 2019: Mia Halton ’73

October 4-November 1, 2019: Mallory Cremin ’84 & Cynthia Brinich-Langlois ’04

November 8-December 6, 2019: Mitra Fabian ‘96 & Erica Rosenfeld ‘97

 

Gund Associate Project Leaders for the Exhibition Series:

Alasia Destine-DeFreece ‘21

Daniela Grande ‘20

Annika Ostrom ‘20

Jenny Tie ‘21

Rebekah Utian ‘22

Catherine Von Holt ‘19

 


 

The Gund Gallery exhibitions and programs are made possible, in part, by the Gund Gallery Board of Directors and the Ohio Arts Council.

supporter-ohioartscoucil

Images top to bottom:

Cynthia Brinich-Langlois (American), Book of Hours: Tire Trough, 2015. Cyanotype on Hosho, woodcut on canvas edged in leather, bound in a scroll. Approximately 12 x 144 inches unrolled. Image courtesy of the artist. Photo by Joseph Mougel.

Mallory Cremin (American), Ocean’s World, 2015/18. Cyanotype photogram on various fabrics, machine quilted. 36 x 32 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Mia Halton (American, b. 1950), Mad As Hell, 2017. Ink on paper. 20 x 40.5 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

 
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